Sunday Times Books LIVE Community Sign up

Login to Sunday Times Books LIVE

Forgotten password?

Forgotten your password?

Enter your username or email address and we'll send you reset instructions

Sunday Times Books LIVE

UKZN Press

@ Sunday Times Books LIVE

Archive for the ‘Fiction’ Category

Jill Nudelman’s novel Inheriting the Earth wins the 2015 Olive Schreiner Prize for Prose

Inheriting the EarthUKZN Press is thrilled to congratulate Jill Nudelman on being co-winner of the 2015 Olive Schreiner Prize for Prose.

Nudelman’s debut novel, Inheriting the Earth, was published in 2013. This book captured the attention of Rosemary Gray, one of the adjudicators, and UKZN Press subsequently submitted it for consideration.

The novel has been praised for its striking insight into the concrete fissures separating South Africans, pitting different races, classes and genders against each other even as there are attempts to bridge the gaps induced by apartheid.

The book was praised as “a novel of great value in the transformation of thinking about indigenous knowledge systems in South Africa through its vivid depiction of the varied rock art renditions of the San people in the interior of the Drakensberg”.

UKZN Press continues to strive for excellence through the books that we publish and congratulates Jill Nudelman on this award.

The Thunder That Roars by Imran Garda, published by Umuzi, is Nudelman’s co-winner. The award presentation ceremony will be held in June in Johannesburg.

 
Related stories:

Book details


» read article

“Moaning is One of the Most Boring Art Forms”: Gcina Mhlophe Recommends Sharing Stories Instead

Umcelo Nezindaba Zase-AfrikaUmcelo Neentsomi Zase-AfrikaStories of AfricaHave You Seen Zandile?
Love ChildOur Story MagicHi Zoleka!Haai Zoleka!

 
Gcina Mhlophe, actress and storyteller, was recently featured on Thabiso Sikwane’s lunchtime radio show on Power FM to speak about the new Oral History Museum, which is opening in Durban.

The Oral History Museum, which also goes by the Story House, has been a dream of Mhlophe’s for a long time. Transferring knowledge to younger generations is an important means of culture.

Before discussing the museum, Sikwane and Mhlophe speak about the Fees Must Fall movement. Mhlophe’s emphasises the importance of education, saying “I’m right behind you, babies”.

Just as the student movements this year have allowed young people to make themselves heard, the Story House is a space for South Africans to tell their stories. For Mhlophe, this has been a long time coming: “It’s been 20 years of wishing and longing and praying for an oral history museum to be opened in this country, where ordinary South Africans can tell their stories.”

Mhlophe hopes that people will take this opportunity to tell their stories instead of complaining what a poor job the rest of the world is doing representing them. “Let’s just do it,” she says “moaning is one of the most boring art forms”.

Listen to the podcast:


 

 
Related Stories:

Book details


» read article

Good Stories and Great Dreams: Gcina Mhlophe Describes Her Hopes for Young South Africans (Video)

Umcelo Nezindaba Zase-AfrikaUmcelo Neentsomi Zase-AfrikaStories of AfricaHave You Seen Zandile?
Love ChildOur Story MagicHi Zoleka!Haai Zoleka!

 
Gcina Mhlophe, actress and storyteller, was recently interviewed by Jennifer Sanasie for News 24.

Mhlophe, who had just given a talk to a group of young people, told Sanasie about how “honoured and humbled” she is to hear about how her work has affected and inspired her audience, and says she is “so excited to see and hear what young people are doing in South Africa today”.

She goes on to speak about the importance of young people being allowed to express their dreams, disappointments and good stories.

Watch the video:

YouTube Preview Image

Book details


» read article

Gcina Mhlophe’s 57th Birthday Celebrated with Friends and Fans (Video)

Haai Zoleka!Hi Zoleka!Umcelo Nezindaba Zase-AfrikaUmcelo Neentsomi Zase-Afrika
Have You Seen Zandile?Love ChildOur Story Magic

 
Gcina Mhlophe recently celebrated her 57th birthday at an event hosted by Newtown Junction.

Friends shared birthday messages, and many people who have been inspired and entertained by the beloved storyteller joined in to wish her well.

Yvonne Chaka Chaka complimented her as a “good-hearted person”, and said she didn’t know her own age. Poets Zaide Hearnecker and Natalia Molebatsi added their well-wishes, as did a host of musicians with whom Mhlope has worked.

Watch the video of personal birthday messages for Mhlophe:

YouTube Preview Image

The celebration included photo opportunities, the chance to write a birthday message, and plenty of singing by Mhlophe and others.

Watch the video:

YouTube Preview Image

 

Book details

 

Image courtesy of Motivation Speakers Bookings


» read article

Details of Mam’ Lauretta Ngcobo’s Memorial Service and Funeral

Let it be ToldAnd They Didn't DieProdigal DaughtersFiki Learns to Like Other People

 
Novelist and essayist Lauretta Ngcobo passed away in Johannesburg last week.

UKZN Press has shared the details of the two memorial services that will be held in honour of Ma’s farewell:

Johannesburg

Date: Tuesday 10 November 2015
Time: 15h00
Christ the King Anglican Church Hall in Sophiatown
49 Ray St, Newtown

Durban

Date: Thursday 12 November 2015
Time: 10h00
St Paul’s Anglican Church,
161 Monty Naicker Rd, (Pine St) Opp The Workshop

The Funeral Service will be held on 14th November at Bisi, Umzimkhulu, KZN.

Directions: Towards Ixopo and Kokstat off the R56.

See also:

Book details

 

Image courtesy of eThekwini Living Legends


» read article

Gracious, Witty and Persuasive: UKZN Press Mourns the Passing of Lauretta Ngcobo

Let it be ToldAnd They Didn't DieProdigal DaughtersFiki Learns to Like Other People

 

We learnt on Wednesday morning of Lauretta Ngcobo’s death. Although she has struggled with her health ever since suffering a stroke, the news still came as a shock.

Ngcobo was born at Cabazi, a village in the Ixopo district, in 1931 and after her schooling at Inanda Seminary near Durban studied at Fort Hare University to become a teacher.

During the 1950s and 1960s she was active in the women’s anti-pass campaign and well known for her feminist stance against both apartheid and Zulu traditions that limited women’s freedom and reinforced their oppression under apartheid. Ngcobo followed her husband, Abednego Bhekabantu (AB) Ngcobo, into exile in 1963. In her contribution in Prodigal Daughters: Stories of Women in Exile, edited by Ngcobo and published by UKZN Press in 2012, she recounts and reflects upon her life in exile. In 1994 she returned to South Africa where, between 2000 and 2009, she would serve as a member of the KZN legislature, chairperson of the National Council of Provinces and chairperson of the Women’s Parliamentary Caucus in the KZN legislature.

Other published works by Ngcobo include Cross of Gold (1981), Let It Be Told: Black Women Writers in Britain (1987), And They Didnt Die (1990) and Fiki Learns to Like Other People (1994). And They Didn’t Die has been described as “the most enlightened and balanced book” about the history and personal anguish of the African woman.

In 2006 she received a Lifetime Achievement Literary Award from the South African Literary Awards; in 2008 the Presidency awarded her the Order of Ikhamanga for her excellent achievement in the field of literature and for her literary work championing gender equality; in 2014 the Durban University of Technology conferred on her an Honorary Doctorate of Technology in Arts and Design “in recognition of her outstanding contribution as a literary figure, her exceptional involvement during her political tenure, her inspirational leadership … as well as her significant ongoing community engagement efforts focusing on education, literary and rural development”.

UKZN Press remembers her as gracious, witty and persuasive; a determined hard worker who often put us to shame with her energy. We are honoured and privileged to have had the opportunity to work with her and to have published her last book.

A memorial service will be held in Durban on Thursday, 12 November 2015. Details will be released in due course.

The funeral service will be held in Mzimkhulu, KwaZulu Natal, on Saturday 14 November 2015.

Condolences to all who were close to her: family, friends, colleagues and comrades.

Mrs Lauretta Gladys Ngcobo is survived by her children, Luyanda, Zabantu, Nomkhosi, Sobantu and Zikethiwe, her sister Thandekile, her grandchildren, great grandchildren and close family. She will be missed by many, many more.

See also:

Book details

 

Image courtesy of eThekwini Living Legends


» read article

Don’t Miss World Religions in Concert Featuring Gcina Mhlophe in Durban

Umcelo Nezindaba Zase-AfrikaUmcelo Neentsomi Zase-AfrikaStories of Africa
Have You Seen Zandile?Love ChildOur Story Magic

 
Gcina Mhlophe, storyteller and author, will be part of World Religions in Concert, taking place at the Denis Hurley Centre in Durban on Monday, 9 November, at 6:30 for 7 PM.

The concert is a celebration of Durban’s vibrant and diverse interfaith community. It commemorates the centenary of the birth of Denis Hurley, who served as bishop and archbishop of Durban between 1947 to 1992.

Artslink has published more details about the event:

The concert has been thoughtfully created to commemorate Hurley’s legacy, to celebrate the opening of the DHC and to demonstrate the role of the faith communities in working together on this project. The KZN Philharmonic Orchestra, which has graciously supported this project, will be conducted by Naum Rousine. They will be joined by the Clermont Community and Emmanuel Cathedral Choirs and noted performers including a Buddhist drumming group from Johannesburg; storyteller Gcina Mhlophe and her daughter Kwezi Becker; acclaimed opera singers Linda Bukhosini and Bongani Tembe; violinist and KZNPOs concert master, Joanna Frankel and opera singer Raphael Vilakazi. They will be joined by children of the six different faith groups represented in this event. (African Traditional, Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim).

The concert begins as the sun sets with the traditional sunset call to prayer from the neighbouring Juma Mosque; with a response from the church bells; followed by Buddhist and Zulu drums and orchestral pieces of Jewish and Hindu music; Muslim chanting and Christian and African choral pieces will all combine to show the richness of Durban’s musical and religious heritage.

Event Details

Book Details


» read article

Join Gcina Mhlophe’s Birthday Celebrations and Support the Oral History Museum Petition

Umcelo Nezindaba Zase-AfrikaHave You Seen Zandile?Love ChildOur Story MagicStories of AfricaSongs and Stories of Africa

 
Iconic South African Gcina Mhlophe will celebrate her birthday and see her dream of an oral history museum come one step closer in Johannesburg this month.

The renowned writer and storyteller will share information about the lifelong project – the establishment of Memory House, an oral history museum honouring the ordinary people who make our lives better – at a special event on Saturday, 24 October, from 12:30 to 3 PM at at Newtown Junction Mall.

You are invited to celebrate Mhlophe’s birthday and the rebirth of our oral history – the event is open to the public and entrance is free. Come and support the 1000 Signature Campaign for the Memory House.

“My own people have named me Gcinamasiko, which means the keeper of heritage; I wear this name like a blanket and honour it with my being,” Mhlophe says.

The Newtown Junction celebrations will feature Mhlophe with Bheki Khoza (musical director and lead guitar), Melvin Peters on piano, saxophonist Jerry Kunene, Paki Peleole on drums, bass guitarist Mandla Zikhalala and percussionists Mabi Thobejane and Mpho Molikeng, who will perform to launch the Hope Song CD.

Event Details

Book details


» read article

Gcina Mhlophe Inspires Creative Writing Students (Plus: Watch Mhlophe Perform at Poetry Africa)

Umcelo Nezindaba Zase-AfrikaHave You Seen Zandile?Love ChildOur Story MagicStories of AfricaSongs and Stories of Africa

 
Legendary storyteller, poet and activist Gcina Mhlophe visited the Durban University of Technology last month where she shared pearls of writing wisdom at the 3rd Writing Competition organised by the DUT Writing Centre.

Mhlophe, who facilitated a workshop with the finalists and was the guest speaker at the awards ceremony, spoke about the importance of writing in your mother tongue.

Read the article:

The prominent Mhlophe told the attendees that, “when they write they write in their mother tongue languages”. “Each and every time as a writer you must use the language you are good at, do not try to write in the language that you are not comfortable with. People must write about something they know well and something that they have experienced,” Mhlophe said.

Siphesihle Mthethwa who is an aspiring poet and DUT student said, “To be in the same room as she (Mhlophe) is a privilege. I am inspired by all her writings and the way she does her thing, it is a wonderful experience to meet her today.”

The 19th Poetry Africa Festival started today, with an exciting line-up of local and international poets.

Vanguard shared a video from 2010 when Mhlophe performed at the 14th Poetry Africa Festival. “Let’s play with an old poem … the weather outside calls for it,” Mhlophe says, before reading “Sometimes When it Rains”.

Watch the video:

YouTube Preview Image

Book details


» read article

“Literature Everywhere Needs Writers that are Paid” – Nthikeng Mohlele

Rusty BellSmall ThingsNthikeng Mohlele recently chatted to Africa39 about the books and authors who have influenced him personally and professionally, his recent artistic projects and the challenges facing writers.

“I think literature everywhere needs writers that are paid, prizes worth winning, greater cross pollination between world cultures and civilisations through translations and preservation,” the author of Rusty Bell and Small Things says.

“Why should great books be out of print—yet no drug dealer runs out of cocaine and heroin or whatnot?”

Read the article:

What are the main challenges you see facing artists, writers, and literary culture in your country and region? How are you ameliorating these difficulties? What specific things would you like to see done in order to address these challenges?

I suppose the overarching limitation in South Africa is the fact that people don’t buy fiction like they do non fiction. Second, as a developing country in a devolving region, it is to be expected that there are more pressing things to people’s time and resources than chasing books—an unfortunate tragedy. Writers should be paid as well as well paid DJs—for instance.

Also read:

 

Book details


» read article