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Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Book launch: The Illustrated Glossary of Southern African Architectural Terms

Franco Frescura, one of the authors of Illustrated Glossary of Southern African Architectural Terms will be giving talks on this book and its impact not only on architecture, but also on an inclusive account of cultural history in SA

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Book launch: The Swimming Lesson and other stories by Kobus Moolman

UKZN Press and Epworth School invite you to the launch of Kobus Moolman’s The Swimming Lesson and other stories.

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Durban book launch of Tribing and Untribing the Archive: Volumes 1 and 2

University of KwaZulu-Natal Press invites you to the launch of Tribing and Untribing the Archive. Dr Vukile Khumalo will be in conversation with editors Carolyn Hamilton and Nessa Leibhammer.

Both volumes of Tribing and Untribing the Archive will be sold as a single set.

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Panel discussion – Tribing and Untribing the Archive: Volumes 1 and 2 by Carolyn Hamilton and Nessa Leibhammer

University of KwaZulu-Natal Press and the Department of Historical Studies, University of Cape Town invite you to a panel discussion of Tribing and Untribing the Archive. Both volumes will be sold as a single set.

The discussion will be followed by snacks.

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Book launch: Tribing and Untribing the Archive: Volumes 1 and 2

University of KwaZulu-Natal Press and the Public Affairs Research Institute invite you to the launch of Tribing and Untribing the Archive: volumes one and two. Both volumes will be sold as a single set during the launch.

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Jane Duncan discusses the media’s role in fees protests and the aftermath of Marikana at the launch of Protest Nation

Jane Duncan discusses the media’s role in fees protests and the aftermath of Marikana at the launch of Protest Nation

 

Protest NationProfessor Jane Duncan was at the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) Centre in Braamfontein recently to launch her new book: Protest Nation: The Right to Protest in South Africa.

Protest Nation looks at the right to protest, Duncan said, as well as how the right is enabled and how it can be abused.

The book comes at a time when the country is grappling with university protests, and a couple of months after the local government elections. The university protests have been marked by intimidation and property destruction, while the elections saw the South African Broadcasting Corporation censoring protest actions it saw as “destructive and regressive” – a decision which was overturned by regulatory board the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa.

One of Duncan’s aims is to rectify inaccurate protest data floating around in the public domain. She said she often finds fault with data sourced from the media and stressed that interested parties should source credible data from municipal and police records instead.

Current censorship and the crackdown on protests that authorities deemed “unlawful” began in 2011 during the local government elections, Duncan said, when an “embarrassed” government resorted to censoring and delegitimising protests.

Municipalities responded by introducing a “wave of prohibitions” when service delivery protests intensified, according to Duncan. This saw the Regulation of Gatherings Act – the law which sets out protest guidelines – being “used as a censorship and political tool”.

Duncan believes the scrutiny on protestors has intensified in the period between the 2011 elections and the university protests last year and this year, with protestors reportedly being harassed, profiled and arrested.

While evidence points to the fact that that protests are increasing in South Africa, Duncan says the media tends to sensationalise the violent protests, while “ignoring peaceful protests”.

Jane Duncan discusses the media’s role in fees protests and the aftermath of Marikana at the launch of Protest Nation“The violence is overstated in media reports which makes people believe that violence has become endemic to protesting,” she said. “They’ve created a moral panic.”

The side effects of exaggerating protest violence is that municipalities and authorities use it as an excuse to increase censorship, and to apply stricter conditions to protest permits. This creates the illusion in the public’s eye that protests are decreasing, when in fact municipalities are choosing not to approve them.

Duncan also spoke about the consequences of the deadly Marikana protests, saying that their aftermath ushered in a number of economic and political shifts that South Africa could ill afford, notably the “fracturing of Cosatu, the expulsion of Numsa and the formation of the Economic Freedom Fighters”.

But a protest as tragic as Marikana would not repeat itself, Duncan said.

Interestingly, the book launch was initially scheduled for the University of Johannesburg, but had to be postponed to a later date and transferred to the SAHRC because it had not met the university’s risk assessment test.

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Lungile Sojini (@success_mail) tweeted live from the event:

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Don’t miss the launch of Michael Chapman’s Green in Black-and-White Times: Conversations with Douglas Livingstone in Durban

Invitation to the launch of Green in Black-and-White Times: Conversations with Douglas Livingstone

 
Green in Black-and-White Times: Conversations with Douglas LivingstoneUniversity of KwaZulu-Natal Press cordially invite you to the launch of Green in Black-and-White Times: Conversations with Douglas Livingstone.

The book recollects conversations over a period of almost 20 years between the scientist-poet and literary critic Michael Chapman.

The event will take place at St Clements Restaurant in Durban on Monday, 31 October.

Don’t miss it!

Event Details

  • Date: Monday, 31 October 2016
  • Time: 5:30 PM for 6:00 PM
  • Venue: St Clements Restaurant
    191 Musgrave Rd
    Durban | Map
  • Refreshments: Cash bar
  • RSVP: elliotts@ukzn.ac.za, 033 260 5226

 
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Don’t miss ‘Universities and Protests’ seminar and launch of Protest Nation: The Right to Protest in South Africa by Jane Duncan

Don’t miss ‘Universities and Protests’ seminar and launch of Protest Nation: The Right to Protest in South Africa by Jane Duncan

 
Protest Nation: The Right to Protest in South AfricaThe University of Johannesburg and UKZN Press invite you to the launch of Protest Nation: The Right to Protest in South Africa by Jane Duncan.

The launch will take place on Thursday, 13 October, at UJ at 3 PM.

The book is published by UKZN Press and examines the regulation of protests in 11 South African municipalities.

Ahead of the launch, Kathleen Hardy will give the fourth commemorative seminar on the Marikana massacre at 1 PM:

Universities and protests: Implications for universities of the United Nations special rapporteurs’ report on freedom of assembly

The seminar is hosted by the UJ Department of Journalism, Film and Television and the Department of Communications.

On 16 August 2012, the police opened fire on striking mineworkers at the Lonmin Mine in Marikana in the North-west Province of South Africa, and scores of mineworkers were killed. This is the fourth seminar being held to commemorate this event.

In March 2016, the Human Rights Council released a report on the proper management of assemblies, written by the Special Rapporteur on the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association and the Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions. This report set out fundamental human rights principles for governments to protect and promote freedom of assembly.

The #feesmustfall protests have shaken the country, and led a nationwide debate about the feasibility of free education. There are also major controversies about violence in protests and the deployment of police and private security guards on campus. What are the implications of this report for South African universities? This seminar will address this question. Kathleen Hardy’s presentation will be followed by a panel discussion.

Kathleen Hardy is a senior legal officer at the South African Human Rights Commission, and has also worked for the Socio-Economic Rights Institute of South Africa and the Centre for Applies Legal Studies. Kathleen has consulted for the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the Special Rapporteurs who drafted the report on the management of assemblies.

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University of KwaZulu-Natal Press at the 2016 Hilton Arts Festival

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University of KwaZulu-Natal Press will be strongly represented at the Hilton Arts Festival this year.

The Hilton Arts Festival takes place from 16-18 September at Hilton College in KwaZulu-Natal.

Cash only tickets can be purchased at the venue door from 30 minutes before each performance.

For more information visit www.hiltonfestival.co.za!

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Zulu Plant Names by Adrian Koopman

17 SEPTEMBER • 12 noon – 1pm • CFI Lecture Theatre

Zulu Plant NamesIn this book Adrian Koopman details the complex relationship between plants, the Zulu language and Zulu culture. Zulu plant names do not just identify plants, they tell us a lot more about the plant, or how it is perceived or used in Zulu culture. For example, the plant name umhlulambazo (what defeats the axe’ tells us that this is a tree with hard, dense wood, and that usondelangange (come closer so I can embrace you) is a tree with large thorns that snag the passer-by. In a similar vein, both umakuphole (let it cool down) and icishamlilo (put out the fire) refer to plants that are used medicinally to treat fevers and inflammations. Plants used as the base of love-charms have names that are particularly colourful, such as unginakile (she has noticed me), uvelabahleke (appear and they smile) and the wonderfully named ungcingci-wafika-umntakwethu (how happy I am that you have arrived, my sweetheart!). And then there are those plant names that are just plain intriguing, if not mystifying: umakhandakansele (the heads of Mr Ratel), isandlasonwabu (hand of a chameleon), intombikayibhinci (the girl does not wear clothes) and ukhuningomile (piece of firewood, I am thirsty).

Adrian Koopman is an Emeritus Professor at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. He retired as Professor of isiZulu Studies after 37 years of teaching Zulu language and literature.

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Writing Home: Lewis Nkosi on South African Writing edited by Lindy Stiebel and Michael Chapman

17 SEPTEMBER • 1.30pm – 2.30pm • CFI Lecture Theatre

Writing HomeLewis Nkosi’s insights into South African literature, culture and society first appeared in the 1950s, when the ‘new’ urban African in Sophiatown and on Drum magazine mockingly opposed then Prime Minister HF Verwoerd’s Bantu retribalisation policies. Before his death in 2010, Nkosi focused on the literary-cultural challenges of post-Mandela times. Having lived for 40 years in exile, he returned to South Africa, intermittently, after the unbannings of 1990. His critical eye, however, never for long left the home scene. Hence, the title of this selection of his articles, essays and reviews, Writing Home. Combining the journalist’s penchant for the human-interest story with astute analysis, Nkosi’s ideas, observations and insights are as fresh today as when he began his 60-year career as a writer and critic.

Lindy Stiebel is a professor of English Studies at the University of KwaZulu-Natal and visiting professor at the University of the Witwatersrand.

Michael Chapman is affiliated as a senior researcher to the Durban University of Technology. He is also an emeritus professor and fellow of the University of KwaZulu-Natal.

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Diaspora and Identity in South African Fiction by JU Jacobs

17 SEPTEMBER • 3pm – 4pm • CFI Lecture Theatre

Diaspora and Identity in South African FictionSouth African identities, as they are represented in the contemporary South African novel, are not homogeneous but fractured and often conflicted: African, Afrikaner, ‘coloured’, English, and Indian – none can be regarded as rooted or pure, whatever essentialist claims members of these various ethnic and cultural communities might want to make for them.All of them, this book argues, are deeply divided and have arisen, directly or indirectly, out of the experience of diasporic displacement, migration and relocation, from the colonial, African and Indian diasporas to present-day migrations into and out of South Africa and diasporic dislocations within Africa. This study of twenty works by twelve contemporary South African novelists – Breyten Breytenbach, J.M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, Aziz Hassim, Michiel Heyns, Elsa Joubert, Zakes Mda, Njabulo S. Ndebele, Karel Schoeman, Patricia Schonstein Pinnock, Ivan Vladislaviç and Zoë Wicomb – shows how diaspora is a dominant theme in contemporary South African fiction, and the diasporic subject its most recognisable figure.

JU Jacobs is Emeritus Professor of English, Senior Research Associate and Fellow of the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban. He has published extensively on South African and postcolonial fiction and autobiography.

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Don’t miss Hlonipha Mokoena’s talk “… if Black girls had long hair” at WiSER

Don't miss Hlonipha Mokoena's talk "... if Black girls had long hair" at WiSER

 
Magema Fuze: The Making of a Kholwa IntellectualHair is once again at the centre of public debates about race, inherited colonial norms, the education of desire and female sexuality.

To make sense of what is at stake, WiSER invites you to a talk by Hlonipha Mokoena titled “… if Black girls had long hair”

Mokoena is Associate Professor at WISER and the author of Magema Fuze: The Making of a Kholwa Intellectual.

Not to be missed.

Event Details

  • Date: Monday, 5 September 2016
  • Time: 1 PM
  • Venue: WiSER Seminar room
    6th Floor Richard Ward Building
    Wits University
    East Campus | Map

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